Common reasons for wanting to install trellis in your garden may be that you want to add that extra bit of height to your fence or wall, you want something that your Clematis or Ivy can climb up, or you simply like the look of trellis and the light and shade it casts upon your garden.

The key question to answer is: do I need planning permission when adding trellis to my fence or wall?

If the fence is next to a highway used by vehicles, or the footpath of such highway, then yes, you need to apply for planning permission if it would be over 1 metre high after the extension.

Fences and walls in other areas can be up to 2m high, and you do not need to seek planning permission if your fence will not exceed this height after installing the trellis topper.

Lattice trellis - is planning permission needed

You can find information on how to apply at the bottom of this page.

Another thing to check first is if the fence is actually yours! There isn’t a set rule about whether you own the fence on the left or right hand side of your property, but you can find out more information from the conveyance deed. We discuss this topic further in this article: Boundary disputes.

Consult with your neighbours

If you’re increasing the height of your dividing fence or wall, this will definitely affect your neighbours. Firstly, it may decrease the amount of light they receive in their garden, although, trellis is a semi-solid addition, therefore the shadows it creates can actually enhance the light cast across your outdoor space. Furthermore, they may own pets that are used to the current height of the fence or wall, therefore increasing the height may confuse them or hinder their ability to travel around. If you’re extra friendly with your neighbours, then wide patterned trellis such as Diamond or Square would enable conversation to continue. If you’d prefer more privacy, then Lattice or Tartan are probably the best option.

trellis toppers

Choose your product carefully

If you’re adding trellis to a wall, it will really stand out, so you want to make sure you pick the right product. If you’re attaching it to a boundary that you share with your neighbour, invite them round and show them some photos of what you’re planning. We’ve had many customer projects where people have added trellis, and been delighted with the results. You can scroll through the stories and photos to get some inspiration here.

Trellis with steel screws

What are the alternatives?

If you’re still unsure whether to install trellis on top of your fence or wall, or your neighbours are being difficult, then consider other options, such as metal railing toppers, or installing a freestanding trellis which act as great screens to create separate areas in your garden. You could even erect a new fence on your side of the boundary to get the extra height. Our Canterbury Combi panels have a built in ‘trellis effect’ in the top quarter, which could satisfy your trellis desires!

How do I apply for planning permission?

Applying for permission is easy. All the essential information is on the Planning Portal, and the form can be completed in three simple steps. From the 10th September 2018, a service charge of £16.67+VAT has been applied to applications that attract a planning fee, so check whether you need to pay before you start.

If you’re looking for more information as to whether you need planning permission for fencing read more here.